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FTC Scam Threats!

Crooks use clever schemes to defraud millions of people every year. They often combine sophisticated technology with age-old tricks to get people to send money or give out personal information. They add new twists to old schemes and pressure people to make important decisions on the spot. One thing that never changes: they follow the headlines — and the money.

Stay a step ahead with the latest info and practical tips from the nation’s consumer protection agency. Below is the latest FTC scam alerts by date




Most Recent Scam Alerts

Consumer Alert

Can you spot an investment scam?

Terri Miller
Investment scammers claim you’ll get big returns investing in a hot new money-making “opportunity” — maybe something like cryptocurrency. Some scammers say you’ll likely make a lot of money if you follow their proven system or method. But will you?
Consumer Alert

Protect yourself from scams as you recover from Hurricane Beryl

Gema de las Heras
If you live in the path of Hurricane Beryl as it moved through Texas, recovering is your number one priority right now. Unfortunately, scammers take advantage of situations like these to strike. Here's some information to help you spot and avoid the scams as you do your best to recover.
Consumer Alert

Contacted about long-lost relative’s life insurance policy or an inheritance? It’s a scam

Jim Kreidler
People are getting letters in the mail from a law firm saying that one of their clients has died and they’re looking for the heir. You are, they say, that heir! (Spoiler alert: you’re not.) The letter goes on to explain their offer: they want to split the proceeds between you, some charities, and their law firm. But what’s really going on?
Consumer Alert

Avoid scam websites that offer to help you get or renew your passport

Gema de las Heras
Do you need to apply for or renew your passport? If you search online, the top results might show official-looking websites that say they can renew or get you a passport. Some of these websites are private companies that charge you for services that are free on the U.S. Department of State website…while others are scammers trying to take your money and personal information.
Consumer Alert

Military Consumer Month 2024

Samuel Levine
July is Military Consumer Month, so we’re deploying advice you can use. No matter what stage of military life you’re going through, you could encounter an imposter scam: someone pretending to be your bank’s fraud department, the government, a relative in distress, a well-known business, or a technical support expert. Want to protect yourself and the people you care about? Let the FTC help.
Consumer Alert

What issues do renters face?

Anna Burns
When you want to know what’s happening in housing, you go to the experts. That’s why the FTC joined renters, renters’ advocates, and researchers in Atlanta to hear about issues affecting renters. They told us that the rise of institutional investors and corporate landlords since the financial crisis has contributed to rising rents, hidden junk fees, issues with online portals, and predatory lease-to-own schemes. Here are some takeaways from housing advocates and renters.
Consumer Alert

Planning to drive in another country? Here’s how to avoid International Driver’s Permit scams

Larissa Bungo
Wondering if you need an international license to drive in a country you’re visiting? Every country has its own rules for visitors who want to drive. In some, like Canada, your U.S. driver’s license is all you need. Other countries require you to get an International Driver’s Permit (IDP). Scammers try to confuse you with fake IDPs and websites that not only take your money and give you nothing but can also cause you trouble abroad.
Consumer Alert

Job scams that start on social media: Appointment Setters

Colleen Tressler
Here’s a new scam spotted on social media: appointment setting jobs. They claim you can work from home and make big money. But just what does an appointment setter do? And how can you tell the difference between a legit job offer and a scam?
Consumer Alert

Adobe used hidden fee to trap people into paying for subscription plans, FTC says

Andrew Rayo
Maybe you want to try out a product for a little while before you make a long-term decision. So, you sign up for a monthly subscription plan. Everything is fine until you want to cancel and it turns out to be a yearly subscription with monthly payments. Surprise! That’s what the FTC says happened to people who signed up for monthly subscriptions with Adobe.
Consumer Alert

What to do if your online love interest offers to teach you how to invest your money

Colleen Tressler
No one thinks their online love interest is going to scam them, but scammers are good at what they do. They establish an emotional connection with you so you’re more likely to believe that they’re an expert in cryptocurrency investing, for example. But that online love interest is a scammer. People have lost tens of thousands ― sometimes millions — of dollars to romance scammers.
Consumer Alert

Hurricane season 2024: How to avoid scams before and after a weather emergency

Colleen Tressler
Weather forecasters are predicting an active hurricane season, but if you live in large parts of the country — including those hit by tornadoes over Memorial Day Weekend — you’ve probably noticed more active storms of all types. To get started preparing for hurricane season or any storm, while avoiding scams, check ftc.gov/WeatherEmergencies for new information to help you spot, avoid, and report scams as you prepare for, deal with, and recover from extreme weather and natural disasters.
Consumer Alert

No one is using your Social Security number to commit crimes. It’s a scam.

Alvaro Puig
The phone rings. Your caller ID says it’s the Social Security Administration. You hesitate. You’re not expecting a call from them, and you’ve heard about impersonation scams. But something inside you makes you pick up. And everything you’re about to hear is designed to scare you into doing whatever the caller says.
Consumer Alert

That text about overdue toll charges is probably a scam

Andrew Rayo
When you go through a toll, you know you’ll need to pay a fee to use that road or bridge. But scammers are targeting drivers with text messages pretending to be from the tolling agency collecting “overdue toll charges.” Here’s what to know about this text scam.
Consumer Alert

Let’s talk about spam texts and emails

Andrew Rayo
Another day, another round of spam texts and emails trying to sell you things. At best, spam is annoying. At worst, it’s pushing scams or trying to install malware on your device. If you’re tired of getting spam, there are some ways to help.
Consumer Alert

Spot scammers looking to profit from Midwest tornadoes

Gema de las Heras
Just as people in Nebraska, Iowa, Oklahoma, and other Midwestern states are reeling from the catastrophic damage caused by tornadoes and other severe weather, scammers are rolling in. They use all kinds of stories to try to trick not just those doing their best to recover, but also anyone who tries to help. The best way to steer clear of these disaster-chasing scammers? Know what their tactics have in common.
Consumer Alert

Pay your bills, not impersonators

Andrew Rayo
If you’re paying a medical, utility, or other bill online, you probably expect to wind up on the company’s website. What might you not expect? An impersonator tricking you into paying them instead. But that’s what the FTC says a company called Doxo did. Here’s what you need to know.
Consumer Alert

Skip the scams as you look for options to avoid foreclosure

Gema de las Heras
Are you having a hard time paying your mortgage? Even if you’ve missed payments or you’re already facing foreclosure, you still might have options. You really do, but that’s the same thing scammers will tell you. Fortunately, there are ways to spot mortgage relief scams while you focus on saving your home.
Consumer Alert

Mystery shopping, (fake) checks, and gift cards

Andrew Rayo
If you’re looking for a new job, getting paid to shop might sound like a dream. Companies hire mystery shoppers to try products or services and share experiences about things like buying or returning something, or their overall customer experience. But while some mystery shopping jobs are legitimate, many aren’t. So how do you spot the scams?
Consumer Alert

Scammers follow the news about student loan forgiveness

Terri Miller
Hearing a lot about federal student loan forgiveness in the news? You’re not alone — scammers are, too. You might get a call from someone saying they’re affiliated with Federal Student Aid (FSA) or the Department of Education. (They’re not.) They’ll say they’re following up on your eligibility for a new loan forgiveness program, and might even know things about your loan, like the balance or your account number. They’ll try to rush you into acting by saying the program is available for a limited time. But this is all a scam. What else do you need to know to spot scams like this?
Consumer Alert

Looking for a postal job? Also look out for job scams

Kira Krown
Thinking about applying for a job with the United States Postal Service (USPS)? Make sure you’re dealing with the real thing. Scammers advertise jobs that don’t actually exist to try to steal your money and personal information — and one way they do that is by pretending to be USPS. So how do you know if that postal ad or offer you get is a scam?
Consumer Alert

If someone you care about paid a scammer, here’s how to help

Jennifer Leach
Sharing a scam experience with someone you know takes courage. If someone trusts you enough to share their scam story, especially if the scammer is still in touch with them, here’s some advice to help guide you.
Consumer Alert

College students are targeted with jobs scams, too

Terri Miller
Getting hired might feel like the ultimate high. But finding out it was just a scammer trying to steal your money will bring you — and your bank balance — right back down. Many college students look for virtual jobs they can do while going to school, but if a new employer mails your first paycheck before you even start working, that’s your cue to stop — it’s a scam.
Consumer Alert

Fighting back against harmful voice cloning

Alvaro Puig
If a call sounds like your boss (asking for bank account numbers) or your family member (begging for help in an emergency), you’re more likely to act. That’s why scammers use voice cloning to make their requests for money or information more believable. And the FTC is fighting back.
Consumer Alert

Influencers: Spot a job scam

Carol Kando-Pineda
Maybe you — or even your pet — are an influencer. But did you know that scammers might target you with phony job opportunities? You might get a message on social media, supposedly from a recruiter or “brand ambassador manager” of a national company. They say they’ll send you free products and pay you big bucks to promote and tag their stuff on social media. All you need to do, they say, is give them your banking information so they can pay you. But this isn’t a job opportunity. It’s a scam, and here’s how to avoid it.
Consumer Alert

FTC Data Spotlight: New insights about imposter scams

Alvaro Puig
If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you know that every year we report on the top scams people tell us about. And that we take a deeper dive into the data through our Data Spotlight reports. A new Data Spotlight about business and government imposters shines a light on the top imposter scams.
Consumer Alert

How to avoid getting wrapped up in a car wrap scam

Ari Lazarus
You’re looking to make some extra money and you get a text or email, or see an ad on social media: get paid to wrap your car and drive around. And the offers can sound good: $600-700 a week to drive around with an ad for some well-known company (usually an energy drink). Many times, these offers are scams — here’s how to spot them.
Consumer Alert

If you have a timeshare, scammers might target you

Gema de las Heras
Maybe you weren’t thinking about selling your timeshare — but suddenly, someone calls and tells you they’re a real estate agent and have an interested buyer. They might have information about you and your property, so the offer seems credible. Then, the so-called timeshare expert asks you to pay upfront to finalize the deal. Stop. That could be a scam.
Consumer Alert

Is it a caregiving job or a scam?

Jim Kreidler
As a nanny or caregiver, you know that families and employers trust you to take care of their children or older adults. It’s the same trust that scammers want to build with you when they post ads for fake jobs to steal your money and personal information. So how do you spot the scam?
Consumer Alert

How to spot hard-to-spot rental scams

Ari Lazarus
Finding an apartment or house to rent that’s safe, affordable, and near amenities you want can be hard for anyone. Folks in the LGBTQ+ community often use community groups on social media to find housing rentals, and people often assume that what’s posted is vetted and safe for community members. But scammers post in these groups, too. Here are ways to spot and avoid rental scams.
Consumer Alert

Paycheck Protection Program lender pays the price for lying about loan processing times

Colleen Tressler
Delays in processing loans needed by small businesses in an emergency — like the pandemic — can leave them struggling to stay open. And deceiving consumers about these delays violates the law. The FTC says that's what happened when small businesses applied for emergency Paycheck Protection Program loans from Biz2Credit Inc.
Consumer Alert

Paycheck Protection Program loan processor told applicants they would get funding. They overpromised

Colleen Tressler
When it comes to small business loans, time is money. That was especially true early in the pandemic: when many small businesses were struggling to stay open, and Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funds were limited. So, when Womply advertised that small businesses, including gig workers and one-person small businesses, could get fast PPP funding if they applied through the company, millions of applications came pouring in. The problem, says the FTC, is that Womply didn’t live up to its promises. And that hurt millions of small businesses.
Consumer Alert

What to know before you click on a “free” computer security scan

Gema de las Heras
With all the security threats out there, you might be tempted to click on a pop-up or ad for a “free” scan to keep your computer safe. Especially if you see a Windows logo. The problem? They’re impersonating well-known companies and scaring you into paying to fix computer problems that may not exist.
Consumer Alert

Planning a spring break getaway? Don’t let scammers clip your wings

Gema de las Heras
When you’re planning a trip — whether it’s a last-minute spring break vacation or another trip — you might be tempted to jump on an offer for a great deal. Unfortunately, scammers sometimes hide behind those offers. Their goal? To try to steal your money Here’s how it could play out.
Consumer Alert

Sham charity turns the Big C into a Big Con. Here’s what to know to avoid a cancer charity scam

Larissa Bungo
The pleas pulled at heartstrings — donate now to help women struggling with breast cancer pay their rent or their utilities — and generous people responded. In truth, barely a penny of every dollar donated went to cancer patients. Today the FTC and ten state partners sued the so-called “charity” that lied to donors about helping cancer patients.
Consumer Alert

Carrying credit card debt? How to avoid debt relief scams

Gema de las Heras
Are you looking for ways to pay off credit card debt? Offers to help you cut down or wipe out your debt might sound like a perfect solution, but dishonest debt relief companies will take your money and do little or nothing to help. So how do you get real help and skip the scammers?
Consumer Alert

Did someone send you to a Bitcoin ATM? It’s a scam

Jennifer Leach
Is there a legit reason for someone to send you to a Bitcoin ATM? The short answer is NO. Will someone from the government send you to a Bitcoin ATM? NEVER. If you’ve followed this Anatomy of a Scam series, you know there’s more to it than that.
Consumer Alert

New tech support scammers want your life savings

Amy Hebert
As we continue our deep dive into imposter scams, we’re taking a look at a new twist on tech support scams. Ever deal with a tech support scam? A warning pops up on your computer. It says your computer has a virus and gives you a number to call for help. You often end up paying hundreds of dollars to a scammer who pretends to deal with the fake virus. Now scammers are upping the stakes — instead of hundreds of dollars, people are unknowingly handing over tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars to tech support scammers. Here’s how.
Consumer Alert

Did you get a call or text about a suspicious purchase on Amazon? It’s a scam

Alvaro Puig
One way to spot a scam is to understand its mechanics. A new and complicated scam starts with a call or text message about a suspicious charge on your Amazon account. But it’s not really Amazon. It’s a scammer with an elaborate story about fraud using your identity that ends with you draining your bank or retirement accounts.
Consumer Alert

Sure ways to spot a scammer

Jennifer Leach
Scammers say and do things that can tell us they’re lying — and they’re not who they pretend to be. Of course, to hear or see those clues, we have to get past the panic scammers make us feel, thanks to the so-called emergencies they try to create. And since scammers are convincing, that can be hard to do. But recent scams are costing people their life savings, so here are some sure ways to spot the scammer.
Consumer Alert

Will your bank or investment fund stop a transfer to a scammer? Probably not

Karen Hobbs
We expect banks and brokers to keep our money safe. We think they’ll stop or warn us about suspicious transfers out of our accounts. But do they? Scammers are exploiting that trust and getting people to transfer their money and drain their retirement accounts to “protect” or “safeguard” or “legalize” it. The truth? The money gets stolen, and banks and brokers won’t get it back from the scammer.
Consumer Alert

What’s a verification code and why would someone ask me for it?

Alvaro Puig
When you log into your bank or credit card account, you might get a text message or email with a verification code. You then enter it at the login screen to confirm it’s really you. That’s a form of two-factor authentication that adds a layer of security to your account — and keeps would-be scammers and hackers out.
Consumer Alert

Never move your money to “protect it.” That’s a scam

Jennifer Leach
People are losing big money to scammers running complicated scams. The scams usually involve someone supposedly spotting fraud or criminal activity on one of your accounts, offering to help “protect” your money, sometimes asking you to share verification codes, and always telling you to move money from your bank, investment, or retirement account. And every bit of it is a scam.
Consumer Alert

Get back on track after the Texas wildfires

Gema de las Heras
Recovering from what is now the largest wildfire in Texas history will be a long process. If you’ve been displaced by the fire, or your home or business was damaged, you’re probably trying to figure out what to do next. Here’s some advice to help you get started.
Consumer Alert

Celebrate National Consumer Protection Week. Talk about scams

Samuel Levine
That call or text might not seem like a scam. It might look like it’s Apple or Microsoft, saying there’s a problem with your computer. (It’s not.) It might seem like it’s Amazon, saying there’s a problem with an order. (Also no.) It might even sound like your grandchild, calling with (supposedly) an emergency. (Still no.) All of these are scammers. This is National Consumer Protection Week (NCPW) and we’re inviting you to join us in talking about scams just like these.
Consumer Alert

Think you know what the top scam of 2023 was? Take a guess

Larissa Bungo
Every day people report to the FTC the scams they spot. Every year, the FTC shares the information we collect in a data book which tells a story about the top scams people tell us about – so we can all spot and avoid them.
Consumer Alert

Be scam free for Black History Month

Terri Miller
February is Black History Month — a great time to help raise awareness in Black communities, and among your family and friends, by staying on top of the latest scams that might affect them. We know that talking about a scam helps you avoid it — and it helps people you care about avoid them, too. Connect with the FTC and share what you learn with others.
Consumer Alert

Did someone tell you to move or transfer your money? It could be a scam

Alvaro Puig
Many impersonation schemes start with a call about a routine problem, like suspicious activity in your Amazon account. But in a new twist, the story quickly takes a more serious turn when you’re told someone is using your information to commit crimes and all your money is at risk.
Consumer Alert

Tracking the first winter storms of the year? So are scammers

Gema de las Heras
With all eyes on the severe weather moving around the country, scammers are paying attention, too. And they’re likely following the path of the storms to target the people affected. So, how do you protect yourself against weather-related scams?
Consumer Alert

Giving money to help after the earthquake in Japan? Spot charity scams

Gema de las Heras
Donating is a great way to help people affected by natural disasters like the earthquake that hit Japan on New Years Day. But you know scammers try to take advantage of people recovering, and those who try to help. So, how can you be sure your money goes where it’s needed?
Consumer Alert

How are robocallers getting your phone number?

Andrew Rayo
Does it ever feel like you’re getting more robocalls than calls from actual humans? Illegal robocalls aren’t just annoying — they’re also often scams. But you might be wondering — how did they get my number in the first place?
Consumer Alert

New year, new weight loss scams

Ari Lazarus
Scammers follow the headlines — and the seasons. As the new year rolls around, we’re sure to hear lots of “new year, new you” advertising around health and fitness products. But some of those promotions are just scams out to get your money. Here’s how to spot them.
Consumer Alert

Job scams targeting college students are getting personal

Lesley Fair
If you’ll be seeing college-age relatives over the holidays, warn them about a variation on the “job interview” scam that students looking for summer or permanent employment have reported to us.
Consumer Alert

Keep scammers away as you deal with East Coast storm damage

Gema de las Heras
Experience tells us that scammers will follow the record-setting winds, rainfall, and storm surge that have left thousands of East Coast residents, from Florida to Maine, under water or without power. As the waters recede, scammers will try to take advantage of people doing their best to recover, trying to steal money and personal information. So how do you protect yourself and those around you?
Article

Invention Marketing Scams

Dishonest invention marketers lie about the profit potential of your invention to get you to pay for expensive, but often useless, services. Here’s what you need to know to avoid an invention marketing scam.
Consumer Alert

Last-minute shopping? Three ways to spot rip-offs

Gema de las Heras
Ever think about clicking on ads for big markdowns or close-out sales in your feed? Social media seems to know what’s on your shopping list, whether it’s the season’s hot toys, electronics, or other popular items. The problem? Scammers are impersonating real companies in ads on Facebook, TikTok, and other social media platforms. So, how do you navigate past the fakes without passing up the real bargains? 
Consumer Alert

Fake shipping notification emails and text messages: What you need to know this holiday season

Alvaro Puig
When you order something online, you might get several emails or text messages about your order: Confirming your order. Telling you it shipped. Saying it's out for delivery. Notifying you about delivery. Did you know that scammers send fake package shipment and delivery notifications to try to steal people's personal information — not just at the holidays, but all year long? Here's what you need to know to protect yourself from these scams.
Article

What To Know Before You Wire Money

Scammers pressure you to wire money to them because it’s easy to take your money and disappear. Wiring money with services like MoneyGram, Ria, and Western Union is like sending cash — once you send it, you usually can’t get it back. Never wire money to anyone you haven’t met in person — no matter the reason they give.
Article

Refund and Recovery Scams

If you’ve been scammed, someone might promise to help you get your money back –– if you pay in advance. That’s another scam.
Consumer Alert

Recovering after tornados in Tennessee? Spot the scams

Gema de las Heras
As residents in Tennessee and other southern states begin to assess the damage caused by deadly tornados and severe weather over the weekend, we know the question is not if but when scammers will show up. Whether you’re a homeowner, a tenant, or a business, scammers will try to take advantage while you’re focused on cleaning up and fixing the damage.
Consumer Alert

Scammers hide harmful links in QR codes to steal your information

Alvaro Puig
QR codes seem to be everywhere. You may have scanned one to see the menu at a restaurant or pay for public parking. And you may have used one on your phone to get into a concert or sporting event, or to board a flight. There are countless other ways to use them, which explains their popularity. Unfortunately, scammers hide harmful links in QR codes to steal personal information. Here’s what to know.
Article

High School Diploma Scams

Thinking about getting your high school diploma? Here’s how to tell the difference between legit programs and diploma scams.
Consumer Alert

Military consumers: The FTC wants to hear from you

Carol Kando-Pineda
Recently, the White House announced some initiatives the Administration is undertaking to improve the lives of the military and veteran communities. The FTC participates in several of these efforts, including the VSAFE task force that’s working to help veterans and their families avoid scams and other deceptive practices.
Consumer Alert

Announcing the FTC’s Voice Cloning Challenge

Alvaro Puig
Voice cloning technologies can generate a near-perfect voice clone based on a short audio clip or snippet of someone’s voice. The technology has potential to help people—for example, people who've lost their ability to speak, offering them a powerful and valuable means of communication. But, in the wrong hands, voice cloning technologies can do harm.
Consumer Alert

Slow your scroll: Spot and avoid social media giveaway scams

Terri Miller
You may have heard us say when you’re shopping online, check things out before checkout. The same advice applies to giveaways on social media sites like Facebook and Instagram. Here’s why: One in four people who reported losing money to fraud since 2021 said it started on social media. Scammers make it hard to tell what’s real and what’s fake. Want to avoid scams on your feed? Slow your scroll and keep reading to find out how.
Article

How To Avoid a Government Impersonation Scam

Scammers pretend to be from government agencies like the FTC, Social Security Administration, and  IRS — or say they're calling about your Medicare benefits. Learn the signs and avoid the scam.
Consumer Alert

Searching for a job to work remotely? Avoid scams and identity theft

Gema de las Heras
Found a job listing to telework as a Spanish translator or a data entry clerk with great benefits and pay? Scammers are impersonating real employers on legitimate platforms like ZipRecruiter and Indeed. When you respond, they might even schedule interviews and send you paperwork that looks legit. But it’s all a scam to get your information and steal your money or your identity. Here’s how to know you’re dealing with a scam.
Consumer Alert

New help for spotting, avoiding, and reporting scams in multiple languages

Larissa Bungo
Scammers speak your language. That's why the FTC now takes reports in multiple languages. To report in Mandarin, Tagalog, Vietnamese, French, Arabic, Korean, Russian, Portuguese, Polish, and many other languages, call the FTC at (877) 382-4357. Press 3 to speak to an interpreter. To report identity theft, call (877) 438-4338 and choose the option for your preferred language. Lines are open between 9am-5pm Eastern.
Consumer Alert

Veterans and scams

Carol Kando-Pineda
As we approach Veterans Day, we thank our veterans for their service and sacrifice. But not everyone has a vet’s best interests in mind. Whether you left the service decades ago or you’re planning your transition to civilian life, scammers will try to get you to send money or share personal information. Scammers also want to get their hands on the valuable benefits you earned through military service. What are some ways to know you’re dealing with a scammer?
Consumer Alert

This Halloween, don’t get ghosted by scammers

Andrew Rayo
Halloween is almost here. What could be scarier than not having your costume ready? How about ordering a costume online and never getting what you paid for? Scammers are making this season extra spooky by pretending to be real companies like Spirit Halloween and Party City. But it’s all a trick. Here’s what to know.
Consumer Alert

Overcharging car buyers based on how they look? That’s illegal

Gema de las Heras
It’s unfair and illegal to increase the amount someone ends up paying to buy or lease a car based on their race or how they look. But that’s how the FTC says a group of three auto dealerships in Rhinelander, Wisconsin allegedly overcharged some of their customers. Read on to learn more about the case — and what you can do to get a fair deal when buying a car.
Consumer Alert

Unmasking sellers of bogus COVID-19 prevention claims

Colleen Tressler, FTC, Division of Consumer and Business Education
​​​​​​​Even though the COVID-19 health emergency is over, many Americans continue to struggle with treatment for illness ― and the FTC will continue go after bad actors who trick people with claims about their products. Case in point: The sellers of The 1 Virus Buster Invisible Mask ― also advertised as The 1 Virus Buster Card ― claim their product gives you an invisible, three-foot barrier of protection against 99.99% of airborne diseases, including COVID-19. Hard to believe? The FTC agrees. Read on to learn more.
Consumer Alert

Safely donating in response to the Israel-Gaza crisis

Larissa Bungo
Following the Israel-Gaza crisis in the news and want to help by donating to a charity? Scammers follow the news, too, and are at the ready. Just like in the wake of a natural disaster, scammers set up fake charities to take advantage of your generosity.
Consumer Alert

Job scam targeting influencers

Larissa Bungo
Did you get a message from a “brand ambassador manager” for a national company wanting to pay you to promote their products online? It could be a scam…but how will you know?
Article

Scammers Use Fake Emergencies To Steal Your Money

Someone calls or contacts you saying they’re a family member or close friend. They say they need money to get out of trouble. Not so fast. Is there really an emergency? Is that really your family or friend calling? It could be a scammer.
Consumer Alert

Children’s Health Insurance Program: Spot the scam

Marissa Hopkins
Finding and keeping health insurance for your family can be stressful and expensive. During the pandemic, your state’s Medicaid Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) might have helped — but with the end of the pandemic, states may be reaching out to update your family Medicaid enrollments. Except scammers might try to get to you first. So how can you spot them?
Consumer Alert

September is National Preparedness Month: Make a plan now

Colleen Tressler, FTC, Division of Consumer and Business Education
Extreme weather and natural disasters can occur with little warning. Communities spared in the past have suffered devastating losses this year, and many are still recovering. National Preparedness Month is a great time to get ready for whatever may come your way.
Consumer Alert

After Atlantic storm Lee, send scammers packing

Gema de las Heras
Atlantic storm Lee brought near-hurricane strength winds and torrential rains to many New England residents — many already affected by wildfires and severe flooding this summer. When you’re doing your best to recover from the destruction caused by back-to-back natural disasters, the words “I can help” may sound like music to your ears. And that’s exactly what scammers count on to try to steal your money or personal information. So how do you weed out the scammers and get real help?
Consumer Alert

What do fraud and bad business practices look like in the Latino community?

Cristina Miranda
Scammers target everyone. But scams and reported bad business practices can play out differently in different communities. Sometimes, scammers set out to target a particular community. Sometimes, they tell a group to pay in specific ways. (Specific ways that make it very hard to get their money back, after they discover the scam.) There are also businesses who harm communities by using tactics that trick people into use their services. So, what do scams and bad business practices look like in the Latino community?
Consumer Alert

Looking for a remote job for a cause you care about? Here’s how to know if it’s a scam

Royal Rose
If you’re looking for a remote job, you might be interested in companies that support a cause. But scammers know that and use your interest to draw you in. If, for example, you’re an LGBTQ+ person or ally, a job that says you can “help LGBTQ+ people in need from the comfort of your own home” might sound great. But what happens if you take that next step?
Consumer Alert

Pay your student loans — not scammers

Ari Lazarus
You’ve probably heard the news — federal student loan repayments are starting again in October. But scammers might try and tell you they can help you avoid repayment, lower your payments, or get your loans forgiven — for a price. Here’s how to spot and avoid these scams.
Consumer Alert

Help spot scammers after Hurricane Idalia

Gema de las Heras
Figuring out the full extent of Hurricane Idalia’s damage could take weeks or even months. But we already know that scammers will follow the path of the storm and try to take advantage of people doing their best to recover. While storms are unpredictable, there are ways to spot the tactics these scammers use — even if they change some of the details — so, read on.
Article

Phone Scams

People lose a lot of money to phone scams — sometimes their life savings. Scammers have figured out countless ways to cheat you out of your money over the phone.

Consumer Alert

Vetting a business or coaching opportunity before you buy in

Alvaro Puig
The FTC charged that a business opportunity and coaching scheme bilked consumers out of tens of millions of dollars. The scheme grew on the back of baseless claims about how much money customers could make.
Consumer Alert

Potential scams following Tropical Storm Hilary in Southern California and Western states

Gema de las Heras
In the wake of Tropical Storm Hilary’s wind damage and catastrophic flooding — to say nothing of the California “hurriquake” — scammers are likely to follow. As people in affected areas try to rebuild and recover, scammers will say they’re a government official offering help, or a contractor who can do the work you need quickly. Help and quick action are good…but how do you spot the scammers?  
Article

Auto Loan Refinancing Scams

Are you having trouble paying your car loan and thinking about doing business with a company that promises to get you a loan with lower monthly payments? Not all refinancing companies play by the rules. Learn how to recognize, avoid, and report auto loan refinancing scams.
Consumer Alert

How to make sure your donations count when weather disasters strike

Colleen Tressler
Throw a dart at a map of the U.S. and chances are you’ll land on a community that suffered severe weather this year. Whether it’s landslides on the West Coast, extreme ice storms in the South, spring tornadoes across the Midwest, recent flooding in the Northeast, or the wildfires consuming the Hawaiian island of Maui, communities have experienced devastating losses ― and many are still recovering. With any weather disaster, you may consider a charitable donation to help those affected. But how you can avoid charity scams?
Consumer Alert

Picking up the pieces after the Maui wildfires

Colleen Tressler
Wind-driven wildfires are causing devastation to the Hawaiian island of Maui. Nobody knows how long it will take to recover from the destruction, but we do know it won’t be long before scammers start trying to cash in. As the smoke begins to clear, here’s some advice to help you spot, avoid, and report disaster-related scams.


Check out the Federal Trade Commisions for more scams


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